D29CEEEA-FDED-4EAA-AB84-D0773FA89891.JPGTart and rich. Sweet and smooth. Everything you love about chocolate covered strawberries – in a glass. Fresh ingredients. Whole ingredients. No added sugar. Healthy fat, protein, and carbs. Need I say more?

Ingredients:

  • 1 c. frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 c. oats
  • 1 c. unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 splash PURE vanilla
  • 1 tbsp flax seeds (optional)
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds (optional)
  • 1 scoop protein powder of choice (optional)

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Blend until smooth!

You can serve this one as a smoothie as showed, however, it is equally good (if not better) as served as an ice cream replacement. Yep, in a bowl, with strawberries on top. What could be better after an ass-kicking workout?

I hope you enjoy this one as much as I do!

xx,

M

For the weeks you don’t meal prep – exactly how I came across creating this dish – this one will be ready in about 20 minutes and makes plenty for the remainder of the week. Dairy free, can be made gluten free, one of my favorite foods, and 2 green vegetables. All in one. It can’t get much better for a quick and easy meal!

Let me clarify something before we get started. Daiya Foods is a company that is proudly dairy free and offers *overall* pretty wholesome ingredients in their products, however, it is considered a processed food.

CHEEZE SAUCE INGREDIENT LIST:

Filtered Water, Tapioca Starch, Non-GMO Expeller Pressed: Canola and/or Safflower Oil, Coconut Oil, Sea Salt, Vegan Natural Flavours, Pea Protein Isolate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Cane Sugar, Lactic Acid (Vegan), Xanthan Gum, Yeast Extract, Titanium Dioxide (A Naturally Occurring Mineral), Annatto (Colour), Onion

(Daiya Foods).Β 

Sure, this food product is processed, meaning it isn’t entirely “clean” but I am clarifying, again, that this meal is intended to be a weeknight meal when you’re short on time – and you could be consuming things far worse than this cheeze sauce. πŸ˜€ if you have any questions regarding the ingredients, you can always send me a direct message or shoot me an email!

ANYWAY, let’s get started!


Ingredients:

  • 1 box pasta of choice – whole wheat, Banza, other gluten-free variations if desired
  • 1 pkg Daiya foods cheese sauce
  • 1 c. broccoli
  • 1 c. snap peas
  • 1 tsp garlic

Directions:

  1. boil water and add noodles once boiling.
  2. take two microwave-bowls and in the first, add broccoli, and in second bowl, add snap peas. Put about a tablespoon of water in each bowl. Microwave each of them (covered) to steam for about 3 minutes each.
  3. Drain pasta in a colander when al-dente.
  4. Add garlic to hot pan with a dash of olive oil and saute for about 5 minutes.
  5. Turn the burner off.
  6. Return pasta back to pot on burner that you have turned off (it’s still warm).
  7. Add pkg of Daiya foodsΒ cheeze of choice along with steamed vegetables.
  8. Add about a teaspoon of each of the following (or more if you prefer): garlic powder, black pepper, dried Italian herbs, Mrs. Dash, and nutritional yeast.
  9. Thoroughly combine and serve!
  10. enjoy!

This makes multiple servings so if you neglected to meal prep (as I did when I created this recipe), you’ll have more to go around for the rest of the week. πŸ˜€

Happy eating!

xx,

M

Healthy, happy, hearty breakfasts on-the-go are the best breakfasts in my humble, almost-nutritionist opinion. πŸ˜‰ Starting the day off with whole grains helps your body keep a steady supply of energy throughout the morning, both eliminating that dreaded, nap-inducing sugar crash, and prevents a 10-am-lunchbox raid.

Let’s get started!


APPLE CINNAMON WHOLE GRAIN MUFFINS

*recipe is vegetarian and can be made dairy/gluten free*

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 c. melted coconut oil
  • 1/4 c. brown sugar/coconut sugar
  • 2 tbsp pure maple syrup
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 c. greek yogurt (or plant-based yogurt of choice)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 c. whole wheat flour
  • 1 c. oats
  • 1 finely diced apple of choice

Directions:

  1. Combine first SIX ingredients (wet ingredients) in a mixing bowl.
  2. In a separate bowl, combine next SIX ingredients (dry ingredients).
  3. Slowly add dry mixture into wet mixture, combining thoroughly.
  4. Fold in diced apple lastly.
  5. Scoop into muffin tins lined with muffin liners and bake for 20-25 minutes at 375
  6. Enjoy!

*serving suggestions: top with nut butter for an easy extra protein, or eat with a hard boiled egg and and half an avocado packed together for aΒ complete breakfast on the go!

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Happy eating!

xx,

M

 

If you’re looking for nutrition FACTS, advice, and how to improve your diet and quality of life overall, read this one. It is written by Walter C. Willett, MD, DrPH with the Harvard School of Public Health.

This book reiterated many of the concepts I have learned throughout my undergrad and showcases a number of studies with new information that might not be what you’d think! Dr. Willett goes through the timeline of the American “healthy” eating guides such as the original food pyramid from the 1990s, and what is challenging about following the current “MyPlate” guidelines.

1990s food pyramid.jpg
remember this one? SOURCE: http://www.healthy-eating-politics.com/usda-food-pyramid.html
my plate
current US meal guidelines. SOURCE:Β https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate

BY THE WAY: the book was updated in 2017 SO this is the latest information you’ll find regarding diet and nutrition.

This book gives you a breakdown of nutrition, and most importantly, gives you a variety of sources as to WHERE to get your protein, carbs, and vitamins!

Breakdown of Chapters:

  1. Healthy Eating Matters
  2. Of Pyramids, Plates, and Dietary Guidelines
  3. What Can You Believe About Diet?
  4. Healthy Weight
  5. Straight Talk About Fat
  6. Carbohydrates for Better and Worse
  7. Choose Healthier Sources of Protein
  8. Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables
  9. You Are What You Drink
  10. Calcium: No Emergency
  11. Take a Multivitamin for Insurance
  12. The Planet’s Health Matters Too
  13. Putting It All Together
  14. Healthy Eating in Special Situations
  15. Shopping Tips, Recipes, and Menus

I was #blessed and found this book for a steal at a bookstore’s closing sale (overall, sad), but YOU can find this book right here for about $15 paperback. IΒ strongly recommend this read to anyone who wants to learn more about evidence-based nutrition practice, and to anyone else who wants to learn the best things to put in their body.

Happy reading, and I hope you find yourself as fascinated as I am with overall diet and nutrition!

xx,

M

 

A morning with an on-call cardiologist can be as variable and exciting as the days the emergency department has graciously prepared me for. Here’s how I spent my morning:

I started the day chatting with Dr. G’s nurse about the schedule, procedures, and variability in patient cases in cardiology. After Dr. G, an interventional cardiologist, had finished rounding for the morning, I joined him to see his first and only clinic patient of the day. The individual had a new onset of shoulder pain when beginning a new exercise regimen, and after both a negative EKG and stress test, was cleared. Dr. G did an exceptional job of explaining everything to his patient, reaffirmed by the genuine “thank you” and kind words he received. This was an excellent reminder of the clinician I aspire to be.

After finishing up with the sole clinic patient of the day, Dr. G and I headed to the cardiac catheterization (cath) lab. Dr. G was on call, but simultaneously had two scheduled angiograms to rule out occlusions.

The first procedure, I observed from the station with the cath lab techs and nurses who explained the procedure to me. I quickly realized how brief the procedure was (only about 15 minutes start to finish), and then reviewed the pictures with Dr. G. It was negative, but very interesting to watch the contrast flowing through the coronary arteries!

The second procedure, another angiogram, Dr. G invited me in the cath lab. I donned surgical scrubs, gowned and gloved (and masked), and wore lead to prevent radiation exposure. This time, I was able to see Dr. G thread the radial artery and inject dye through and into the heart. Unlike the previous angiogram I saw, there was notable blockage and Dr. G concluded that the patient would need either triple or quadruple bypass surgery rather than cardiac stents.

The photo depicts an image similar to what I had seen on the left.

angiogram.png
coronary angiogram – A: before cardiac catheterization (notable blockage) B – after cardiac catheterization; occlusion notably improved **not my image** (see below for image credit)

After talking to Dr. G about conscious sedation, he explained that he uses Versed and fentanyl and only the smallest amounts to start, because it isn’t necessary to completely sedate the patients during the procedure. He explained that he can always increase the dosage if the patient is uncomfortable.

Lastly, Dr. G got a page from the internal medicine doctor for a patient on the floor. This too, presented a learning opportunity for me – I listened to abnormal breath sounds and heard a heart murmur for the first time.


A few things that drew me in:

  • the opportunity to educate patients about their health andΒ howΒ to make lifestyle changes.
  • the near-instantaneously relief that interventional cardiology provides in such a small, minimally invasive procedures.
  • the high-acuity and helping sick,Β sick individuals recover.

 


Three takeaways:Β 

  1. Interventional cardiology is more reactive rather than proactive.
  2. Educating the patient is probably the most effective way to not only achieve greater patient satisfaction, but will also increase the probability that the patient will be motivated to make changes.Β 
  3. The correlation between heart disease and diabetes is notably strong.Β 

Shadowing physicians and being in the hospital, especially at the beginning of a long semester reminds meΒ why I still choose medicine every day. The opportunity to spend an entire day with the gift of having the ability to improve someone’s quality of life sounds like a career I still hope to have.

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I look like a surgeon.

For my guide to having a positive shadowing experience in the hospital yourself, click here!

Thanks for reading!

xx,

M

 

**Image credit:Β https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Coronary-angiogram-A-Total-occlusion-of-the-mid-RCA-and-70-narrowing-of-proximal-RCA_6875106_fig2

My friend over at @heardtohealed on Instagram, Stephen Groner, has combined his experiences of being an ENT patient, and having a career in speech-language pathology and wrote a book full of simple ways for you and I to improve our interactions with patients – making our jobs more enjoyable, and our patients’ satisfaction greater!


Stephen breaks down bedside manner into three chapters:

  1. Starting: Impressive First Impressions
  2. Listening: Giving Them the Mic
  3. Talking: What to Say and How to Say It

In my clinical experience so far, I have found that it can be challenging to relate to patients, relay information, and rationalize a scenario with a patient or their family when they are angry, frustrated, or feeling other hard-to-cope-with emotions. Though these situations tend to get easier the more one experiences them, it remains difficult to know if you are doing or saying the “right thing.” According to Stephen, you’ll learn that sometimes silence is better, and a gesture means more than finding the right thing to say.

Read this book, a quick read (under 70 pages), and reference it when you want to refresh your approachability and success with your patients and your interactions with them. Find it in ebook form here for only $7! I am so glad I read this book, not only for how I can work on the dynamic I have with my current emergency department patients, but also with skills I hope to integrate in my future practice as a physician!

Happy reading! And while you’re at it, go check out Stephen’s pageΒ for inspiration and humility!

xx,

M

 

When an American is asked to name a college food, what comes to mind? Ramen. In a cup. In a package with the block of noodles and a flavor package. Nutrient-dense? Wholesome? Identifiable ingredients? Nope. Comforting? Warm? Satisfying? You bet.

I have taken this brick of noodles and made it a little bit more bearable but all the more satisfying. Today, brick of of noodles + a time crunch = something I hope you will love as much as I do. πŸ™‚ It won’t take you very long either!

*recipe is vegan/vegetarian*


Ingredients:

  • green vegetables of choice (I used broccoli and snap peas)
  • 1 c. vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce/tamari
  • 1/2 c. water
  • 1 tsp minced garlic (or so)
  • 1 block ramen noodles from pkg, or 1 pkg of fresh ramen noodles
  • 1 tsp black sesame seeds for garnish & extra flavor

How-To:

  1. Saute vegetables of choice in olive oil al dente. Add garlic and kill the heat.
  2. Remove vegetables from pot and add broth and water to the pot. Bring to a boil.
  3. Add noodles and cook according to pkg (about 3 minutes).
  4. Add the soy sauce/tamari to the bottom of serving bowl.
  5. Grab noodles from broth with a spaghetti spoon. Pour broth into serving bowl over soy sauce/tamari
  6. Place noodles in bowl in the broth mixture
  7. Place vegetables on top of noodles and arrange as desired.
  8. Top with sesame seeds and serve with chopsticks or a fork πŸ˜€

Take that, college! And as always, happy eating!

xx,
M