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My preceptor has assigned me plenty of reads to enhance my experience as a student-nutritionist this summer. Without getting into specific details about the clinic I work at, I can say that a large portion of our patients are refugees, immigrants, or both. I have been enriched by various cultural experiences right with my own patients. This book was extremely fitting.

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down is a story about a Hmong family who immigrated to the United States in the 1980s. The large family settled in Merced, California among other Hmong families. The Lee family had a healthy daughter named Lia who later developed a seizure disorder when she was 3 months old. This story describes the challenges with a language barrier, and not only that, but the lack of similar terminology across different languages. During certain parts, when Lia was brought to the emergency department, I couldn’t stop reading.

If you plan on going into medicine, nursing, pharmacy, or any other allied healthcare profession, READ THIS STORY.

In the United States, we nearly unanimously agree with modern medicine and our healthcare system. When you go to an ER, you expect to wait. You trust the physicians to diagnose you based on how they examine you, what your scan looks like, and how your labs come back. We believe and trust our doctors, and if we don’t, we can get a second opinion. What if something goes horribly wrong in our care? A misdiagnosis that leads to mistreatment? We have options. But if those things cannot be communicated, much less understood, would you feel safe trusting these professionals?

This story is a reminder of perspective and that our system in the US is simply one way of tackling the healing process. That’s all it comes down to; wanting the best for our patients and their families and making them feel better. That’s why we choose medicine. If you choose to read this story, which I highly encourage, you will learn so much about the US medical system, you will learn about the Hmong culture, and you will learn to be more culturally sensitive. Find it here.

Happy reading!

xx,

M

 

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The name of the book sounds…scary. And as we all know, the food industry in the United States can be rather that way. You are probably aware that obesity rates are increasing and not showing any signs of letting up, in fact, it continues to increase over time. You probably know that sugar is “bad,” and high fructose corn syrup is even worse as far as long term health consequences go. You have probably been told that burgers should not be a staple of your diet. But what SHOULD you eat? Read this one to find out. You’ll find that it’s a lot more simple than you’d think!

Dr. Furhman, a family medicine-trained medical doctor takes the current research behind diet and nutrition and applies it on a smaller scale. He also takes American history and gives insight as to how some of the deprivation we face has started – something I had hardly thought of previously. And not only does Dr. Fuhrman take the historical context of our country, he discusses the current socioeconomic disparities throughout the US; part of which is to blame for our current SAD (Standard American Diet). My nutrition program focuses on health disparities and working on solutions to these problems, so his aim resonated with me and what I hope to become as a future physician.

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Dr. Fuhrman also discusses food additives, preservatives, saturated fat, ketogenic (or high-protein, low carb) diets, epigenetics and genomics, eating intact grains and how to cook them, and some of the psychological effects of food. He does a great job decoding some of the daunting terms and explains them in a way that the non-scientist can understand. Each time I read a book written by either a physician or a nutrition professional regarding nutrition, I am inspired and enriched by their knowledge and passion to change the food industry, and help other live healthier and more purposeful lives.

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The best part about this book is that I found it at a closing bookstore (sad, yes), and it was 75% off !!!!!! I do not remember how much I paid for it, but if you desire to read this one, which I strongly recommend, you can find it on Amazon for about $16. 🙂 Click here for Dr. Fuhrman’s website, and find him on Instagram. ALSO, Dr. Fuhrman has written several books that have caught my eye… Don’t be too surprised if you catch me reading those too. 😀

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ANNNNND… my personal favorite image from the book. 😛

As always, happy reading!

xx,

M

 

 

 

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Anti-diet diets are among my favorite diets out there. Jennifer Adler, a Certified Nutritionist in the state of Washington, wrote the book Passionate Nutrition resonating with my perspective on nutrition practice:

FOOD IS MEDICINE.

Jennifer discusses her negative relationship with food throughout her life, describing her early life in poverty, surviving off of packaged foods and being truly hungry. Her story is a beautiful example of her passion, her own experience, and a career all coming together. I highly, highly recommend this read if you want to create a more positive relationship with food, feel better overall, and learn how food is quite literally, medicine.

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I personally enjoy reading books and research provided by nutritionists and dietitians to learn others’ perspectives and ideas in the regarding food, diet, and implementation. The most influential individuals in the field, to me, are the ones who live by their practices and share the love with others.

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Chapters include:

  1. My Story
  2. Your Story
  3. The 100-year-diet
  4. A Gut Feeling
  5. The Protein-Sugar Connection
  6. Weight Loss and Metabolism Miracle
  7. Food Miracles, Body Miracles
  8. What is Your Body Saying
  9. Three Ingredients for Natural Beauty
  10. Good Food, Good Sex

*a section of recipes concludes the book*

Find Passionate Nutrition here and purchase used for less $. 🙂

Happy reading,

xx,

M

If you’re looking for nutrition FACTS, advice, and how to improve your diet and quality of life overall, read this one. It is written by Walter C. Willett, MD, DrPH with the Harvard School of Public Health.

This book reiterated many of the concepts I have learned throughout my undergrad and showcases a number of studies with new information that might not be what you’d think! Dr. Willett goes through the timeline of the American “healthy” eating guides such as the original food pyramid from the 1990s, and what is challenging about following the current “MyPlate” guidelines.

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remember this one? SOURCE: http://www.healthy-eating-politics.com/usda-food-pyramid.html
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current US meal guidelines. SOURCE: https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate

BY THE WAY: the book was updated in 2017 SO this is the latest information you’ll find regarding diet and nutrition.

This book gives you a breakdown of nutrition, and most importantly, gives you a variety of sources as to WHERE to get your protein, carbs, and vitamins!

Breakdown of Chapters:

  1. Healthy Eating Matters
  2. Of Pyramids, Plates, and Dietary Guidelines
  3. What Can You Believe About Diet?
  4. Healthy Weight
  5. Straight Talk About Fat
  6. Carbohydrates for Better and Worse
  7. Choose Healthier Sources of Protein
  8. Eat Plenty of Fruits and Vegetables
  9. You Are What You Drink
  10. Calcium: No Emergency
  11. Take a Multivitamin for Insurance
  12. The Planet’s Health Matters Too
  13. Putting It All Together
  14. Healthy Eating in Special Situations
  15. Shopping Tips, Recipes, and Menus

I was #blessed and found this book for a steal at a bookstore’s closing sale (overall, sad), but YOU can find this book right here for about $15 paperback. I strongly recommend this read to anyone who wants to learn more about evidence-based nutrition practice, and to anyone else who wants to learn the best things to put in their body.

Happy reading, and I hope you find yourself as fascinated as I am with overall diet and nutrition!

xx,

M

 

My friend over at @heardtohealed on Instagram, Stephen Groner, has combined his experiences of being an ENT patient, and having a career in speech-language pathology and wrote a book full of simple ways for you and I to improve our interactions with patients – making our jobs more enjoyable, and our patients’ satisfaction greater!


Stephen breaks down bedside manner into three chapters:

  1. Starting: Impressive First Impressions
  2. Listening: Giving Them the Mic
  3. Talking: What to Say and How to Say It

In my clinical experience so far, I have found that it can be challenging to relate to patients, relay information, and rationalize a scenario with a patient or their family when they are angry, frustrated, or feeling other hard-to-cope-with emotions. Though these situations tend to get easier the more one experiences them, it remains difficult to know if you are doing or saying the “right thing.” According to Stephen, you’ll learn that sometimes silence is better, and a gesture means more than finding the right thing to say.

Read this book, a quick read (under 70 pages), and reference it when you want to refresh your approachability and success with your patients and your interactions with them. Find it in ebook form here for only $7! I am so glad I read this book, not only for how I can work on the dynamic I have with my current emergency department patients, but also with skills I hope to integrate in my future practice as a physician!

Happy reading! And while you’re at it, go check out Stephen’s page for inspiration and humility!

xx,

M

 

I spent this weekend at a small lake in the woods in Minnesota before the craziness of the school year begins. Without even saying it, I’m sure you could guess that I finished most of yet another book! This was such a perfect way to close out the summer.

In this memoir, Dr. Kathy Magliato writes about her path and current life as a cardiothoracic surgeon (one of the few women in the field) as well as a heart transplant surgeon. Her story consists of multiple stories that get her to where she’s at today including having children despite the busy lifestyle her career gives, being married to a liver transplant surgeon, and how her training made her an ever stronger person.

Dr. Magliato is hard on the outside, strong-willed and does not give up, but she also describes the kind of physician she is in that she sits down with her patients, prays with them, and offers them her “free” time and her full attention.

Her stories are both motivating and inspiring to me and Dr. Magliato’s work and philosophy of putting her patients first is exactly the kind of physician I aspire to be.

Read if you are interested in the life of the operating room, the rigorous training of becoming a specialized surgeon, and what it’s like to be a minority in the field of medicine – and prevail.

Do yourself a favor. Read this one. 😀

Find it for about $12 on Amazon and to read more about Dr. Magliato, check out her website!

Happy reading, friends!

xx,

M

 

 

The emergency room will always have a special place in my heart.

Regardless of anything I have personally experienced, it is well know that the ED is its own entity; its own unique branch of medicine that is nothing like the other areas of the hospital.

We see people at their very worse, sometimes grasping by straws for a chance at survival, and others, aren’t as patient with the wait time. There are sprains, strains, fractures, and lacerations all day, critically ill stroke codes, STEMIs, and traumas all night – well, not necessarily in that order. The department doesn’t sleep and any emergency personnel can tell you a plethora of stories that you might think are too bizarre to be true, but trust us, they are not!

This is best illustrated in the story by Dr. Paul Austin in Something For the Pain: Compassion & Burnout in the ER.

With my continuing experience in the emergency department, I enjoyed reading the struggles and triumphs Dr. Austin faces as an attending emergency medicine physician.

Dr. Austin discusses specific cases he has faced throughout his career and training, but not only that, he talks about how these patients and their stories affect him as a person and his family overall.

Having a career in emergency medicine is a high-stress at high stakes career. Dr. Austin describes how this career nearly ruined his family. It is a reminder that medicine is a rewarding, yet demanding career that proves that if you do not feel that you are taking care of yourself, you will not be best-fit to take care of others in what may be their most desperate times of need.

Read this one to gain insight into life from the trauma bay, the stories on night shift, the forbidden “S” and “Q” words in the emergency department, and the selfless side of medicine that the doctor taking care of you faces each night they try and sleep.

Dr. Austin’s website describes his book more and will give you a preview of his second book.

Find it on Amazon for about $10.

Happy reading, as always!

xx,

M