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Spaghetti carbonara is a favorite amongst us Americans. It’s rich and full of flavor, and makes for the ultimate comfort food. But, like most comfort foods, it’s richness will weigh you down.

Being the huge advocate for comfort food that I am, I’ve been recipe testing this dish for a while, hoping to get it just right. I think I’ve found a winner. Instead of compromising flavor, I’m adding protein, veggies, and lightening up the dish.

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Ingredients:

  • 1 pkg Banza spaghetti
  • 1 c. cooked peas
  • 1/2 c. cooked broccoli (shredded)
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • about 1 tbsp olive oil
  • salt & pepper

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Directions:

  1. Cook pasta according to directions. Drain and RINSE. This is especially important if you are using a starchy pasta made from lentil, bean, or quinoa flour!
  2. Return the pot to the burner. Turn to medium heat and saute garlic for about 5 minutes.
  3. –> TURN THE HEAT OFF <– extremely important!*
  4. Add pasta, peas, and broccoli to pot and begin to stir to combine.
  5. Quickly add beaten eggs (as to not scramble them!!!) to pot and stir.
  6. Add salt & pepper to taste.
  7. Top with fresh parsley, grated parmesan, or shredded asiago.

 

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Notes:

*turning the heat off is the most important step of this dish; if you do not, you will risk scrambling the eggs you’re adding. As much as we all love scrambled eggs, I don’t imagine you’d love them in your pasta 😀

*Banza pasta is gluten free, and made from chickpeas thus giving it a higher protein content than white pasta. You can supplement any kind of pasta you like, but using a pasta made from a legume (like chickpeas), will give this dish the higher protein content

*Again, rinsing your pasta is the second most important step. Because you’re using a gluten free, high protein pasta, it is full of plant-based fiber (hence making it starchy). Rinsing your pasta will get rid of this extra starch and make the texture and flavor much better in your dish.

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enjoy!

xx,

M

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I could talk about bananas for quite a long time.

DID YOU KNOW…

One medium banana constitutes one of your two recommended servings of for the day.

One banana alone makes up for about 20% of your daily potassium recommendation.

One banana is the perfect pre-workout or post-workout fuel due to its carb content and potassium content that helps replenish the electrolytes that are lost in sweat.

In fact, did you know that the other electrolyte, sodium, is overly-consumed in the SAD (standard American diet), but potassium is likely to be deficient? Dietary potassium isn’t as readily available as dietary sodium, but once you’re aware of the foods that are rich in the micronutrient, it becomes much easier to consume foods that contain more potassium.

So long story short, bananas make for a versatile snack, are pre-packaged by mother nature, and are full of macronutrients AND micronutrients.

We all know that bananas vary greatly throughout their post-picked life span. When bananas are green in color, they are rich in probiotics, but most of us don’t desire the taste because they don’t present very sweet at this stage. When bananas are light to dark yellow, they’re sweeter and more enjoyable to eat. When bananas start getting spots, that’s when you know they’re on their way out, but probably pretty sweet. This is my personal favorite stage* 😀 However, when bananas start turning dark brown and the spots are more and more numerous, you might find yourself wanting to throw them away, as I do. BUT DON’T DO IT – at any of the described stages! Aged bananas are a versatile ingredient to have on hand. Let me show you some of the wonderful things you can do before you think about throwing your precious bananas out.


 

1. mash them:

 

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Add a mashed banana to your oatmeal before you cook it, add it to your peanut butter toast for breakfast or a snack, or top your pancakes with a mashed banana – you won’t even need syrup!

When? Perfect for that lightly spotted-medium spotted stage.

2. freeze them: 

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Frozen bananas are the staple to the majority of the smoothies I make because they A) make your smoothie creamier, B) naturally sweeten your smoothie and C) and make it cold without adding ice that will eventually water your smoothie down. To freeze, I recommend cutting the banana in half, peeling the banana, and placing in an airtight bag or container and let freeze for at least 12 hours.

When?  In the darkened-spotted stage for peak sweetness but not when the entire banana is browned or else you’ll have a mushy banana.

3. bake them:

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Banana bread, baked oatmeal, healthier cookies, etc. Again, bananas provide natural sweetness and serve as a binding agent in several recipes. What’s not to love there?

When? This is when those BROWN bananas come in clutch. Mash them up well and incorporate into your favorite recipe!

 

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I hope bananas make you this happy too.

xx,

M

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The name of the book sounds…scary. And as we all know, the food industry in the United States can be rather that way. You are probably aware that obesity rates are increasing and not showing any signs of letting up, in fact, it continues to increase over time. You probably know that sugar is “bad,” and high fructose corn syrup is even worse as far as long term health consequences go. You have probably been told that burgers should not be a staple of your diet. But what SHOULD you eat? Read this one to find out. You’ll find that it’s a lot more simple than you’d think!

Dr. Furhman, a family medicine-trained medical doctor takes the current research behind diet and nutrition and applies it on a smaller scale. He also takes American history and gives insight as to how some of the deprivation we face has started – something I had hardly thought of previously. And not only does Dr. Fuhrman take the historical context of our country, he discusses the current socioeconomic disparities throughout the US; part of which is to blame for our current SAD (Standard American Diet). My nutrition program focuses on health disparities and working on solutions to these problems, so his aim resonated with me and what I hope to become as a future physician.

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Dr. Fuhrman also discusses food additives, preservatives, saturated fat, ketogenic (or high-protein, low carb) diets, epigenetics and genomics, eating intact grains and how to cook them, and some of the psychological effects of food. He does a great job decoding some of the daunting terms and explains them in a way that the non-scientist can understand. Each time I read a book written by either a physician or a nutrition professional regarding nutrition, I am inspired and enriched by their knowledge and passion to change the food industry, and help other live healthier and more purposeful lives.

***

The best part about this book is that I found it at a closing bookstore (sad, yes), and it was 75% off !!!!!! I do not remember how much I paid for it, but if you desire to read this one, which I strongly recommend, you can find it on Amazon for about $16. 🙂 Click here for Dr. Fuhrman’s website, and find him on Instagram. ALSO, Dr. Fuhrman has written several books that have caught my eye… Don’t be too surprised if you catch me reading those too. 😀

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ANNNNND… my personal favorite image from the book. 😛

As always, happy reading!

xx,

M

 

 

 

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It is difficult in our country to decipher what different food labels mean or what they can cause you to think about food in general. Health claims on food tend to offer you enormous benefits that are not necessarily backed by science, nor do they necessarily provide you with the benefit they claim to give.

Afer having analyzed labels in a variety of nutrition courses over time, I have created a list of these terms and labels and what they really mean – in hopes for you to reference them – whether they’re good, and informative, or…not that way. 😀


 

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GLUTEN FREE: a food is only allowed this label if it contains 10 parts per million or less of gluten. This is often certified through the Gluten Free Intolerance Organization (GFIO) which is regulated with the USDA’s labeling standards. This label helps those with Celiac’s Disease spot “safe” foods, and others who are avoiding gluten by choice the same. Does gluten free mean “healthy?” Foods labeled “gluten free” are not necessarily healthier or more nutrient dense. There are plenty of cakes, cookies, pastries, crackers, and other processed foods now certified gluten free, offering those with an allergy or sensitivity, or Celiac Disease an option to enjoy their favorite foods too without gluten that causes them problems. If you see this label, you can safely assume is that there is NO GLUTEN in the product.

 

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KOSHER: Probably the least known and recognized, Kosher foods are those that are deemed pure according to the Jewish law. Click here for all the standards for meat, fish, and other foods (koshercertification.org). This symbol above shows Americans that the food product is suitable to consume if one is observing dietary Kosher laws.

 

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NATURAL: there isn’t a specific label that is associated with this nutrition claim simply because the term itself is misleading and ambiguous. The Food and Drug Administration, as well as the United States Department of Agriculture do not provide federal regulation as to what constitutes a “natural food.” This claim is misleading, vague, and cannot promise any benefits. Some food will be labeled as “natural” with other promised claims such as “no MSG, no preservatives, and no hydrogenated oil” which can be helpful to some, but remember, read the label, and that this claim is not regulated.

 

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NON-GMO: a product with this label means that it does not contain any genetically modified organism (GMOs). The certification is based on the Non-GMO Project whose “commitment is to preserve and building sources of non-GMO products, educating consumers, and providing verified non-GMO sources.” If a food contains this label, you can be assured that your food has not been genetically modified. Beyond this, non-GMO food may or may not have other significant health benefits.

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ORGANIC: This label is regulated by the United States of Agriculture as clearly observed by the label. For a food product to earn this label, it has to be produced by approved methods: “cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that fosters cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.” Similar to the “gluten free” claim, you can be assured that food with this label IS organic, but does that necessarily translate to “healthy?” No. There simply isn’t enough research to conclude that products labeled as organic provide more benefits than those that are not.

 

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VEGETARIAN: vegetarian products in the United States are not regulated by the FDA or USDA. Therefore, independent organizations in our country have pridefully labeled their food as such – promising the absence of meat or meat products in their food items. If you purchase something with the vegetarian label (often a green symbol with a plant on it), chances are, that company takes great pride in their product and ensuring their product does not contain meat. Does vegetarian mean “healthy”? Something labeled “vegetarian” simply means the product does not contain meat. Though a plant-based diet does have plenty of benefits, there are plenty of other factors to consider when determining if a vegetarian product is deemed, “healthy” such as if the product saturated fat, sugar content, whole grains, and processed ingredients.

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VEGAN: Similar to vegetarian, this label isn’t regulated by a government branch, but it is regulated by private companies such as Vegan.org which promise that there is zero amount of animal product in compliance with vegan standards. Does vegan mean “healthy?” Again, as mentioned previously about vegetarian products, eating a plant-based diet has benefits backed by research, however, did you know Oreos are technically vegan (though they might be cross-contacted with milk in some countries) ? Oreos are made from high fructose corn syrup, and other food additives; so overall, just because something like an Oreo is vegan doesn’t necessarily mean it is “healthy.”


As with anything, it is important to be a well-informed consumer by reading labels thoroughly, and understanding what they mean. I hope that by reading this, you are able to make more educated decisions about choosing foods when shopping and what you choose to purchase!

As always, thank you for reading!

xx,

M

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Wherever I go, whenever I travel, whenever there’s a new place in town, I cannot wait to try it. Tell me that being a “foodie” hasn’t influenced my decision to study nutrition as an undergrad! My point here, is that as much as I love cooking and creating new recipes, I equally enjoy eating out and trying new dishes as well as revisiting my old favorites.

Food is the center of culture: in many communities/ethnic groups, and consequently, offering food or sharing a meal together shows that one is welcome in that community. Going to eat is often a social outing simply shared around good food. With this social benefit of going out to eat together, the concept of eating out often gets a bad rap – this is due to our food culture in the U.S., not you!

Why, though? Portions are often out of control, dishes are loaded with excessive calories, and the meal can get expensive pretty quickly. Keep reading to learn how to eat out with more intention and to hack the food system while enjoying good food and company!

***


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blood orange mimosa with brunch? ok.

1. Drinks?

Soda and other speciality drinks can be more than three dollars per drink which are high in sugar and extra calories before your meal even begins. The easiest solution?

Order a water.

Free drink, free refills, no calories, and helps your stomach and body prepare for the meal you’re about to enjoy! What if everyone is ordering drink, drinks though? I suggest ordering one and drinking it slowly to enjoy it and not spend more than you had initially planned on.

 


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packed salad without dressing!

2.  Salad?

Though salads usually are thought of as “the healthier alternative,” as you’re getting greens and vegetables in, you’d be surprised to see that at some restaurants, salads can be higher in calories and saturated fat than some burgers. What? How? The dressing is usually the culprit. Solution?

Ask for the dressing on the side.

You are then able to control the amount you want to put on your own salad and you’ll probably find yourself leaving some dressing behind. Restaurants often give WAY more than the recommended serving size alots for.


3. Not enough nutrients for you?

IMG_0186Noodles & Co small spicy korean beef noodles with shrimp instead of beef and added broccoli 🙂

Many restaurants are accommodating and want to help make your meal the best way you’d enjoy it; it’ll bring you back in! After long tennis practices followed by weight lifting in college, my teammates and I would go to Noodles and Company to refuel. Now, not only does Noodles provide minimally processed fast food with fresh ingredients, they are one of the many restaurants happy to help customize your dish. After tennis practice, I would order a pasta dish (hello post-workout carbs), and in addition to whatever vegetables came with that dish, I would add broccoli and sauteed peppers for a few cents more. That way, you get even more vegetables and consequently, more nutrients, from your meal. Mac and cheese sounds really good? Spaghetti with meatballs? Chicken alfredo as a treat? Add some vegetables!

You will get to enjoy your favorite dish, but also enjoy the benefits of getting more nutrients in one meal. Yay!


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get dessert and share it 😉

4. Portion size too big?

If you go to other countries, and I’m thinking of European countries specifically, you’ll note that portions sizes are much smaller than that of ours in the US. This portion size isn’t your fault. But there are two different things you can do about it.

One: Share your dishes.

When you have someone to split your dish with, you’re eating half the calories, half the fat, half the grossly portioned size the restaurant often doses out. This alone will decrease your chances of overeating and getting a stomach ache, and you will likely not regret your decision to eat out. If you order dessert, too, ALWAYS share. 🙂 The other option is…

Two: Get a to-go box when you get your food and put half in the box.

Boom, two meals for one price and immediate portion control. This will prevent you from overeating from the start and give you another meal for the next day. Two meals for one price! What’s better than that!


5. Sides?

Sure, a big burger is a treat for many to have as a “cheat meal” but what usually accompanies that? French fries, onion rings, you get it. If you want to opt to get some nutritional benefit from a meal like this,

Request a different side dish.

Swap french fries for steamed broccoli, onion rings for grilled vegetables, a cornbread muffin for corn on the cob. Most restaurants offer a variety of sides that you can pick from, only it’s up to you to make the change! Check out the menu of Famous Dave’s sides for example.


6. What comes on that?

As mentioned with dressing (see #2), restaurants tend to smother and load things on their meals such as mayo, cream-based sauces, barbeque sauces, alfredo sauces, mustards, ketchup, butter, or other unwanted or unnecessary additives. The solution?

Ask what comes on the meal you’re about to order.

The clears up any confusion, alerts you to any potential allergens, and gives you a heads-up as to what you’ll be consuming. If any of the ingredients listed are not something you want, as if you can skip that item, like the salad, ask for it on the side, or request a healthier alternative. This way, you are eliminating unnecessary cals or fats or sugars, and YOU are controlling how much you put on your meal.

*Bonus tip, my brother’s tip is to skip mayo and add avocado. You get the creaminess you desire [on a sandwich] without the processing, fat, and calories, and you get healthy (monounsaturated) fat from a plant source – woo!


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adding salmon to my favorite sesame salad at the North Dakota Museum of Art Cafe

7.  Protein source?

Grilled or crispy? Chicken, steak or pork? Broiled or fried fish?

We’re often faced with a lot of options when it comes to choosing a protein source; especially at restaurants. Solution?

Choosing a lean, grilled or broiled protein source.

Choosing grilled chicken, black or pinto beans, roasted turkey, dishes with lentils or peanuts (legumes), or those with nuts such as almonds, pecans, or walnuts give you the leanest, and minimally processed protein sources. Avoid fried foods. Though they are better than nothing, they offer minimal nutritional benefits and pose potential health risks if consumed all too frequently.


8. What’s fresh?

Restaurants are often proud to disclose what they have on-hand. Some restaurants have partnerships with other local companies and will disclose where they get their honey, eggs, chicken, and produce from. If you’re looking for a healthier option when you go out to eat, eating at local, independently-owned restaurants are more than likely going to offer you higher quality ingredients and more flavor in your food.


Now, if you are enjoying a meal that’s a treat or going out is a treat for you, don’t feel guilty about your food choices. If you go to a specific restaurant a few times a year and go there specifically for their homemade baked mac & cheese with breadcrumbs (my weakness) and Moscow mules, don’t make food swaps. Enjoy your meal. What you can do is also get a water to drink with your favorite cocktail, and bring half of your mac & cheese home so you don’t eat too much, and you have more to eat later. Never follow a “diet” that deprives you from indulging every once in a while. Eating your favorite foods (though they might not fit into your every day “diet”) is good for the soul – trust me! As long as we aren’t eating this way all the time.

With that, I thank you for reading and I hope this helps when you choose to eat out at your favorite restaurants, trying new ones, and when you travel!

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xx,

M

 

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Anti-diet diets are among my favorite diets out there. Jennifer Adler, a Certified Nutritionist in the state of Washington, wrote the book Passionate Nutrition resonating with my perspective on nutrition practice:

FOOD IS MEDICINE.

Jennifer discusses her negative relationship with food throughout her life, describing her early life in poverty, surviving off of packaged foods and being truly hungry. Her story is a beautiful example of her passion, her own experience, and a career all coming together. I highly, highly recommend this read if you want to create a more positive relationship with food, feel better overall, and learn how food is quite literally, medicine.

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I personally enjoy reading books and research provided by nutritionists and dietitians to learn others’ perspectives and ideas in the regarding food, diet, and implementation. The most influential individuals in the field, to me, are the ones who live by their practices and share the love with others.

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Chapters include:

  1. My Story
  2. Your Story
  3. The 100-year-diet
  4. A Gut Feeling
  5. The Protein-Sugar Connection
  6. Weight Loss and Metabolism Miracle
  7. Food Miracles, Body Miracles
  8. What is Your Body Saying
  9. Three Ingredients for Natural Beauty
  10. Good Food, Good Sex

*a section of recipes concludes the book*

Find Passionate Nutrition here and purchase used for less $. 🙂

Happy reading,

xx,

M

 

D29CEEEA-FDED-4EAA-AB84-D0773FA89891.JPGTart and rich. Sweet and smooth. Everything you love about chocolate covered strawberries – in a glass. Fresh ingredients. Whole ingredients. No added sugar. Healthy fat, protein, and carbs. Need I say more?

Ingredients:

  • 1 c. frozen strawberries
  • 1/2 c. oats
  • 1 c. unsweetened almond milk
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  • 1 splash PURE vanilla
  • 1 tbsp flax seeds (optional)
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds (optional)
  • 1 scoop protein powder of choice (optional)

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Blend until smooth!

You can serve this one as a smoothie as showed, however, it is equally good (if not better) as served as an ice cream replacement. Yep, in a bowl, with strawberries on top. What could be better after an ass-kicking workout?

I hope you enjoy this one as much as I do!

xx,

M